Thomas Cunniffe

NOTES FROM THE EDITOR (09-20)

Hello everyone— Welcome to the new edition of Jazz History Online, now emanating from our new permanent headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware. Many of you have asked why I decided on Wilmington. It was the usual real estate combination: price and location. Apartment rents are much lower here than most cities on the East Coast (and […]

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MINGUS AT ANTIBES (Atlantic 3001 [LP]/Rhino 72871 [CD])

It was hot in the summer of 1960, but it wasn’t all due to the weather. Civil Rights was a regular topic on the evening news. With racial inequality still part of our daily lives in 2020, Thomas Cunniffe felt that it was appropriate to re-examine Charles Mingus’ explosive concert at Antibes from July 1960, featuring Ted Curson, Eric Dolphy, Booker Ervin, Dannie Richmond and special guest Bud Powell.

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BACK TO WORK!

The COVID-19 virus shut down live concerts within a few days. The re-emergence of concerts is a slow process, but Thomas Cunniffe reports that musicians can get back to work if they are willing to create their own opportunities.

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JAZZ IN THE TIME OF COVID-19 (September 2020)

In a continuing series, Jazz History Online devotes its CD Review section to discs issued during the pandemic. Thomas Cunniffe reviews 8 discs this time, including “Artemis”, Dena DeRose’s “Ode to the Road”, Dave Douglas’ “Dizzy Atmosphere”, Sarah Elgeti’s “Dawn Comes Quietly”, Brian Landrus’ “For Now”, Allegra Levy’s “Lose My Number”, Maria Schneider’s “Data Lords” & Kenny Washington’s “What’s the Hurry”.

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NOTES FROM THE EDITOR 05-20

Hello everyone— We have entered a strange time over the last few months. Who could have expected that a virus would so affect our lives and our livelihoods? As we try to pull ourselves out of quarantine and back into our daily routines, let us not forget the lessons of COVID-19 by appreciating all of […]

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JAZZ IN THE TIME OF COVID-19 (May 2020)

The COVID-19 has shut down the world’s economy in short order. For many jazz artists, recorded music is their only source of income. The albums reviewed here are all current releases; most of them were released during the period of nationwide lockdown. These reviews by Thomas Cunniffe will be a continuing feature on Jazz History Online as long as the crisis continues. The current set was adapted from what was to be a standard collection of vocal and piano reviews; the reviews in future issues will encompass all types of instrumental and vocal jazz. JHO has always encouraged its readers to support the musicians by purchasing their CDs. The message could not be more urgent now. If you can afford to help, please do.

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THE FRENCH CONNECTION

Since the early 1900s, French classical composers and jazz musicians have influenced and inspired one another. Two new recordings examine this unique cross-relationship. “Impressions of Debussy” offers straight performances of Debussy’s Preludes by pianist Lori Sims, followed by jazz interpretations by soprano saxophonist Andrew Rathbun and pianist Jeremy Siskind. “The Melodic Line”, the sophomore release by Reverso–co-led by trombonist Ryan Keberle and pianist Frank Woeste–presents new works inspired by the composers of the French collective Les Six. Thomas Cunniffe reviews both albums in this special CD Review.

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LENNIE TRISTANO & LEE KONITZ: DUETS (but not with each other)

Lennie Tristano and Lee Konitz were constantly grouped together because of their decades-long association: first as teacher and pupil, then as leader and sideman. It may seem surprising that they never made a duet recording together, but soon after their last gig together, both men started an album of duets…with other musicians. In this Retro Review, Thomas Cunniffe discusses the classic “Lee Konitz Duets” and the new Tristano release “Duo Sessions”.

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