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Dexter Gordon, Teddy Wilson, Kurt Elling, Renee Rosnes, Helen Sung, Cool Yule!
Details in Notes from the Editor
New in Book Reviews:
"SOPHISTICATED GIANT: THE LIFE & LEGACY OF DEXTER GORDON" (by Maxine Gordon)
The extraordinary life of Dexter Gordon is the subject of two fine biographies, one written in 1989 by British journalist Stan Britt, and the other, just published, by Gordon's manager and widow, Maxine. In this month's book review, Thomas Cunniffe compares the two books, noting what each author chooses to highlight and omit. 




New in Retro Reviews:
Teddy Wilson was one of the most prolific jazz musicians of the 1930s, recording with Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday, and many others. No single CD box set could ever cover all of Wilson's recordings from this period, and Mosaic's new collection contains some--but not all--of Wilson's best sides as a leader, including all of his solo tracks, several combo sessions and all of his big band tracks. Thomas Cunniffe reviews the contents of the set in this month's Retro Review. 


Historical Essays:
FRANKIE NEWTON:
THE FORGOTTEN TRUMPETER
(Part 1) 
(Part 2)
Despite appearing on some of the greatest jazz records of the 1930s,  and possessing one of the most personal sounds in jazz history, trumpeter Frankie Newton is barely remembered today. His biography is filled with contradictory information, and his discography has several mysterious gaps. Thomas Cunniffe sorts out the conflicting details and discusses all of Newton's recordings in this special 2-part Historical Essay.

Interviews:
"TIMELINE": AN INTERVIEW WITH CHRIS BRUBECK
In 1958, the Dave Brubeck Quartet made a historic four-month tour of Europe and the Middle East for the US State Department. The tour was the subject of a PBS documentary, and the latest album by Brubeck's sons Chris and Dan. Thomas Cunniffe chatted with Chris about the tour and his father's legacy.

Special Holiday Feature:
MUSIC FOR A COOL YULE (2018)
Happy Holidays from Jazz History Online! For our annual feature, Music for a Cool Yule, Thomas Cunniffe and Marti Mendenhall offer capsule reviews of the best in holiday jazz, both new and classic. We have received far less holiday discs for review this year, so we hope that you will look through the entire list to find a new holiday favorite, regardless of whether it is a new release, or one from years past.

New in Concert Reviews:

KURT ELLING AT THE SOILED DOVE, DENVER (December 12, 2018)
In what is fast becoming a holiday tradition, Kurt Elling performed a spectacular concert at Denver's Soiled Dove. This year, he sang two separate sets, one of Holiday music (from his album "The Beautiful Day") and the other featuring protest music (from "The Questions" and the new digital EP, "The Questions--LIVE"). Thomas Cunniffe reviews both concert sets and the live EP in this Concert Review.

New in CD Reviews:

BEBOP AND BEYOND
If we place the origin of jazz sometime around 1905 and then place the emergence of bebop around 1945, we find that the music is about 113 years old, and bebop has been part of its language for 73 years—considerably over half of the music’s history. The three albums featured in this month's instrumental CD reviews all owe much of their inspiration to the bebop masters. Thomas Cunniffe reviews the albums by Richie Cole, Christopher Hollyday and Bruce Barth.

THE JAZZ ART SONG
The art song has been a staple of European and American classical music for two centuries. It's possible that jazz has found its equivalent in two new albums led by Renee Rosnes and Helen Sung. On each album, the pianist/composers have collaborated with a living, jazz-influenced poet to create song cycles with potent messages and room for improvisation. Thomas Cunniffe compares these stunning new releases in this special CD review. 


VOCAL DIVERSITY
The five vocalists featured in this month's CD reviews offer something for everyone. Alyssa Allgood impresses with her sophomore disc, "Exactly Like You", Mark Winkler and Cheryl Bentyne celebrate 1959 in Greenwich Village on 'Eastern Standard Time", Bob Dorough offers quirky takes on well-known songs on "But for Now" and Judy Niemack collaborates with Jim McNeely and the DR Big Band for a multi-faceted salute to New York. Thomas Cunniffe provides the details. 
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