The Front Page
Your Subtitle text

JATP at the Opera House, Peggy Lee, Miles Davis, Gary McFarland!
Details in Notes from the Editor
New in Historical Essays:
AT THE OPERA HOUSE
In 1957, Norman Granz launched the 18th tour of Jazz at the Philharmonic. The concerts yielded 5 separate albums featuring Ella Fitzgerald, Oscar Peterson, the Modern Jazz Quartet, Stan Getz, J.J. Johnson, Coleman Hawkins, Roy Eldridge and the JATP All-Stars. All of the albums were titled "At the Opera House" but on four of the five albums, the mono editions were recorded at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles! In this Historical Essay, Thomas Cunniffe sorts out the discographical maze and discusses all five of the albums in both their mono and stereo editions.

New in Book Reviews:
"IS THAT ALL THERE IS?:
THE STRANGE LIFE OF
PEGGY LEE" (by James Gavin)
From the beginning of her 6-decade career, Peggy Lee was the personification of understatement. Her subtle vocal delivery said more with one note that most singers did with several, and on film, she could entice the entire audience with only a raised eyebrow. James Gavin's new biography, "Is That All There Is" examines Lee's life and music. In his Book Review, Thomas Cunniffe argues that because the book's primary focus is on Lee's personal life, it might discourage new fans from exploring her music.  

New in Retro Reviews:
MILES DAVIS/JOHN COLTRANE: "ALL OF YOU: THE LAST TOUR, 1960"
By 1960, John Coltrane had played with Miles Davis for nearly five years. With the release of "Giant Steps", he was auditioning musicians for his own quartet. However, Davis needed Coltrane for an tour of Europe, and Coltrane reluctantly accepted. A new 4-CD set from Acrobat collects many of the tour's highlights, and in this Retro Review, Thomas Cunniffe recommends  it for its improved sound quality and its detailed liner notes by Simon Spillett.

Profile:
MEET ANITA WARDELL
Anita Wardell may be the greatest singer you've never heard. Well-known in Europe, but barely known in the US, Wardell is one of the best scat singers in jazz today, and she also is a superb interpreter of vocalese, jazz originals and standards. Thomas Cunniffe introduces you to Wardell in this profile which features 5 complete audio selections and a video performance. 

An important announcement:
Jazz History Online is now soliciting and accepting advertisements. In keeping with the interests of our readers, the ads are restricted to items frequently used by musicians. We hope that you will visit the websites of our advertisers, and encourage your  musician friends to explore our site and our advertisers. We will continue to keep our PayPal portal open for those who wish to donate to our site directly. We thank you for your loyal readership and your continued support of Jazz History Online. 

New in CD Reviews:

MEMORIES AND MEMORIALS
The words "memory" and "memorial" come from the same root, but they hold different connotations. In this month's instrumental CD reviews, Thomas Cunniffe examines how these concepts are contrasted and combined in albums by saxophonists Jimmy Greene, Houston Person and Dayna Stephens.



SOPHISTICATED LADIES
Standards are part of every jazz vocalist's repertoire, and the three women featured in this month's vocal CD reviews all share deep love and knowledge of the standard repertoire. Thomas Cunniffe discusses an autobiographical CD by Cat Conner, a soulful recital with B3 organ by Nancy Kelly, and a direct-to-2-track recording by Melissa Stylianou.


New in DVD Reviews:
THIS IS GARY McFARLAND
When Gary McFarland died in 1971, he had been praised as one of the 1960s most innovative jazz arrangers and vilified by the same critics for incorporating rock and Brazilian music into his scores. A new documentary, "This is Gary McFarland", attempts to restore McFarland's lost fame. In his DVD review, Thomas Cunniffe notes that the film takes too narrow of an approach to McFarland's wide musical horizons.


Sidetracks:
"KEEP ON KEEPIN' ON" 
Clark Terry is one of jazz's greatest mentors. There's hardly a jazz musician working today that hasn't been touched by this gentle, wise giant. A new documentary, "Keep On Keepin' On", captures Terry and his gifted student, pianist Justin Kauflin, as they each face numerous obstacles. Thomas Cunniffe provides a sneak preview in this special edition of Sidetracks.

Interviews:
EXPANDING THE SCOPE OF VOCAL JAZZ WITH KERRY MARSH AND JULIA DOLLISON
In the spring of 2010, vocal jazz fans were treated to a pair of amazing recordings: "Vocabularies" by Bobby McFerrin (arranged by Roger Treece) and "The Music of Maria Schneider" by Kerry Marsh and Julia Dollison. Marsh and Dollison are better known in educational circles than to the jazz public, but their recordings continue to astound listeners. In this exclusive Jazz History Online interview, Thomas Cunniffe talks to Marsh and Dollison about the Schneider album, their quartet Vertical Voices and the future of vocal jazz. 

Jazz History Online is optimized for use on Firefox, Google Chrome and Opera browsers.
We do not support or recommend Microsoft Internet Explorer.