The Front Page
Your Subtitle text
 
Kind of Blue, Judy Carmichael, Jazz Lofts, New CD Reviews!
Details in Notes from the Editor
New in Retro Reviews:
MILES DAVIS: "KIND OF BLUE"
& "JAZZ TRACK"
Jazz history textbooks will all tell you that Miles Davis' 1959 masterpiece "Kind of Blue" was important because of its extensive use of modal improvisation. Thomas Cunniffe agrees wholeheartedly with that statement, but wonders if the modes were simply a means to an end. He traces the history of the album through its immediate predecessor, "Jazz Track" and finds a simple reason for the album's artistic and popular successes.

Book Reviews:
"SWINGER!: A JAZZ GIRL'S ADVENTURES" (by Judy Carmichael)
Jazz's coexistence of styles allows any musician of any age, gender or race to pursue any genre they wish, even if it's not currently in style. Still the late 1970s appearance of Judy Carmichael, a white, blond and stunningly beautiful stride pianist turned several heads. In her new memoir, "Swinger!", Carmichael offers a compelling narrative that jumps between various points in her life, and alternates between comedy and tragedy. Thomas Cunniffe offers his reactions.


Historical Essays:
FRANKIE NEWTON:
THE FORGOTTEN TRUMPETER
(Part 1) 
(Part 2)
Despite appearing on some of the greatest jazz records of the 1930s,  and possessing one of the most personal sounds in jazz history, trumpeter Frankie Newton is barely remembered today. His biography is filled with contradictory information, and his discography has several mysterious gaps. Thomas Cunniffe sorts out the conflicting details and discusses all of Newton's recordings in this special 2-part Historical Essay.

Profiles:
LUCIANA SOUZA:
PASSION AND VERSATILITY
Few contemporary vocalists have the stylistic range of Luciana Souza. She is a remarkable improviser and composer who can not only offer passionate interpretations of songs from America and Brazil, but is also a collaborator with contemporary classical composer Osvaldo Golijov. Thomas Cunniffe introduces you to Souza in this JHO profile, which includes audio and video clips of Souza at work


New in CD Reviews:
GENTLEMEN SONGSTERS
Male jazz vocalists are a rare commodity these days, but performers like Kurt Elling, Allan Harris and John Proulx enhance jazz with their unique approaches to the music. Thomas Cunniffe reviews the latest albums from these fine gentlemen of song.





ORIGINALS
Jazz compositions have been around almost as long as jazz improvisers. While improvisation is rightly considered as an essential component of jazz, soloing without some sort of pre-arranged structure would be little more than strings of meaningless notes. In this essay review, Thomas Cunniffe examines new recordings by Lynne Arriale, Leslie Pintchik, Renee Rosnes and Martin Wind, where each leader provides their stellar musicians with inspiring repertoire.


TWO CD REVIEWS
FROM MICHAEL VERITY

Former JHO contributor Michael Verity helped us out this issue by reviewing a pair of new CDs. Rather than mixing them in with Thomas Cunniffe's notices, we've given Michael his own spot. He offers his reactions to Jim McNeely's "Barefoot Dances and Other Visions" and McClenty Hunter's "Groove Hunter". 



New in DVD Reviews:
"THE JAZZ LOFT, ACCORDING TO
W. EUGENE SMITH"
In the midst of Manhattan's wholesale flower district, painter David X. Young, composer Hall Overton, and photographer W. Eugene Smith hosted a loft space for jam sessions and rehearsals. Many of New York's finest jazz musicians spent time at the loft, and Smith made tape recordings and took photos of the proceedings. Much of the material has survived and it provides the visual and aural content of the new documentary The Jazz Loft, According to W. Eugene Smith. Thomas Cunniffe provides his thoughts on the film.
 
Jazz History Online is optimized for use on Firefox, Google Chrome and Opera browsers. 
We do not support or recommend Microsoft Internet Explorer.