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 Fred Hersch, Fred Astaire, Lee Morgan, Cool Yule, Kurt Elling, The Swingles!
Details in Notes from the Editor
New in Book Reviews:
"GOOD THINGS COME SLOWLY:
A LIFE IN AND OUT OF JAZZ"
(by Fred Hersch)

Like most autobiographies, “Good Things Happen Slowly” is a story of discovery and identity. However, as the subject is Fred Hersch, this book tells of the more-or-less simultaneous emergence of two distinct (and for some, incongruous) character traits, that of a gay man and of a jazz pianist. Thomas Cunniffe reviews this touching memoir, notable for its candor and understated tone.


New in Retro Reviews:
FRED ASTAIRE:
"THE ASTAIRE STORY"
Fred Astaire may not have been a fan of his own singing voice, but Norman Granz was, and in 1952, he called up Astaire to propose a 4-LP set commemorating his career. Astaire turned him down, but after his son reminded him of the JATP concert recordings they listened to at home, Astaire changed his mind. A new double CD reissue of "The Astaire Story" has just been released, and Thomas Cunniffe details the music and backstory of this timeless recording.


New in Historical Essays:
FRANKIE NEWTON:
THE FORGOTTEN TRUMPETER
(Part 1)
(Part 2)
Despite appearing on some of the greatest jazz records of the 1930s,  and possessing one of the most personal sounds in jazz history, trumpeter Frankie Newton is barely remembered today. His biography is filled with contradictory information, and his discography has several mysterious gaps. Thomas Cunniffe sorts out the conflicting details and discusses all of Newton's recordings in this special 2-part Historical Essay.

Profiles:
LUCIANA SOUZA:
PASSION AND VERSATILITY
Few contemporary vocalists have the stylistic range of Luciana Souza. She is a remarkable improviser and composer who can not only offer passionate interpretations of songs from America and Brazil, but is also a collaborator with contemporary classical composer Osvaldo Golijov. Thomas Cunniffe introduces you to Souza in this JHO profile, which includes audio and video clips of Souza at work



Newly revised:
THE COMPLETE SWINGLE SINGERS DISCOGRAPHY
Recently updated to include their recent releases (including guest appearances) JHO's Swingle Singers discography offers in-depth information on every recording the group has made over the past 54 years.

Special Holiday Feature:
MUSIC FOR A COOL YULE (2017)
For the sixth straight year, Jazz History Online wishes you a happy holiday with a swingin' playlist! You'll find lots of old favorites here, plus several new gems. All of the links have been updated, so you purchase the perfect recordings for tree-trimming, holiday gatherings and big family dinners. May all your Yules be Cool!





New in Concert Reviews:

KURT ELLING & THE SWINGLES AT THE SOILED DOVE, DENVER (December 5, 2017)
On a chilly night in Denver, Kurt Elling and the Swingles heated up the stage of the Soiled Dove with an eclectic repertoire of jazz, pop, folk, blues and holiday favorites. Thomas Cunniffe was in attendance, and he writes about the spectacular performances by Elling and the Swingles, Elling's outstanding new band, and of a quickly-devised encore which involved all of the singers. 


New in CD Reviews:
ADORATION OF THE LYRIC
Lyrics are a central focus of the singers featured in this month's vocal reviews. Drawing on an extensive legacy of singers like Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra, Jo Stafford, Peggy Lee and Ray Charles, these singers interpret songs in ways that emphasize important words in the song. Thomas Cunniffe reviews new CDs from Michelle Lordi, Hilary Gardner, Stacey Kent and Cheryl Bentyne, which cover a wide range of lyric complexity. 
 

REVISITED AND RENEWED
For this month's Instrumental CD reviews, Thomas Cunniffe explores the debut and follow-up releases of two remarkable groups: John Beasley's Monk'estra. and Dave Douglas' Riverside. Beasley's group offers stunning big band versions of classic Thelonious Monk compositions, while the quartet Riverside explores music stemming from the Jimmy Giuffre 3 and Ornette Coleman Quartet. 



New in DVD Reviews:
"I CALLED HIM MORGAN"
On a winter night in 1972, Lee Morgan's estranged common-law wife, Helen, shot and killed the trumpeter in the middle of a packed nightclub. The details of the murder have been elusive for decades, but a new film by Kasper Collin, "I Called Him Morgan" uses an audio interview of Helen and the memories of Lee's musical colleagues to describe the events leading to the trumpeter's death. Thomas Cunniffe reviews the film, recently issued on DVD.


 
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