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Frankie Newton, Bill Holman, Fred Hersch, Bill Evans, Jane Ira Bloom, Katie Thiroux!
Details in Notes from the Editor
New in Historical Essays:
FRANKIE NEWTON:
THE FORGOTTEN TRUMPETER
(Part 1)
(Part 2)
Despite appearing on some of the greatest jazz records of the 1930s,  and possessing one of the most personal sounds in jazz history, trumpeter Frankie Newton is barely remembered today. His biography is filled with contradictory information, and his discography has several mysterious gaps. Thomas Cunniffe sorts out the conflicting details and discusses all of Newton's recordings in this special 2-part Historical Essay.

Historical Essay:
THE 1968 BILL EVANS TRIO WITH EDDIE GOMEZ & JACK DEJOHNETTE 
Newly Revised to include the recently released CD, "Another Time: The Hilversum Concert"
For about 6 months in the middle of 1968, pianist Bill Evans led a remarkable trio featuring bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Jack DeJohnette. Up until now, the only recordings that existed of this group were the Grammy-winning LP "Bill Evans at the Montreux Jazz Festival" and a handful of bootleg recordings. In this Historical Essay, Thomas Cunniffe discusses all of the group's recordings (including a newly released--and previously unknown--studio session) as well as a rare TV broadcast. 

New in Book Reviews:
"CONVERSATIONS WITH BILL HOLMAN" (edited by Bill Dobbins)
At the age of 90, Bill Holman is as active as ever, leading his LA-based big band, fulfilling commissions for new compositions and arrangements, and (in the near future) being the subject of a new documentary. "Conversations with Bill Holman" is the result of a week-long series of interviews conducted by Holman's friend and colleague, Bill Dobbins. In his review, Thomas Cunniffe notes that most of the material is easily accessible to the average educated jazz fan, but that the reader should come in with knowledge of Holman's famous scores.


Profiles:
LUCIANA SOUZA:
PASSION AND VERSATILITY
Few contemporary vocalists have the stylistic range of Luciana Souza. She is a remarkable improviser and composer who can not only offer passionate interpretations of songs from America and Brazil, but is also a collaborator with contemporary classical composer Osvaldo Golijov. Thomas Cunniffe introduces you to Souza in this JHO profile, which includes audio and video clips of Souza at work


New in Concert Reviews:
KATIE THIROUX TRIO AT NOCTURNE (October 3, 2017)
When an artist goes on the road to promote a new album, the sounds which come from the bandstand may be significantly different than what was captured in the studio. In the case of bassist/vocalist Katie Thiroux, those differences came from a change in the personnel of her touring group. Thomas Cunniffe reviews Thiroux's live performance at the Denver nightclub, Nocturne, and compares the music played there to Thiroux's new CD, "Off Beat".

New in Sidetracks:

POETIC JAZZ
In addition to being brilliant poets, Emily Dickinson and Carl Sandburg shared a deep appreciation for music. Dickinson was an amateur pianist and reportedly, a skilled improviser in the classical sense; Sandburg was a jazz fan, and an avid performer of American folk songs. In their latest albums, Jane ira Bloom and Matt Wilson celebrate Dickinson and Sandburg respectively, using stunning mixtures of poetry and music. Thomas Cunniffe spotlights both albums in this Sidetracks essay review.


New in CD Reviews:
FROM 1 TO 11
The above title is not a reference to Spinal Tap’s amplifiers. Rather, it designates the size of the ensembles featured in this month’s Instrumental CD Reviews. Thomas Cunniffe reviews these fine new albums by Fred Hersch, Bill Charlap, Annie Booth, and Josh Nelson. 
 

PAST, PRESENT...AND FUTURE?
Twenty-five years in the music business can either make several changes to an artist's approach, or it can leave the artist pursuing the same style that brought them original acclaim. Kellye Gray's new double CD "Rendering" combines her debut disc with new versions of the same songs. Thomas Cunniffe contemplates the changes in Gray's style, and compares them to new albums by Diana Krall and Jazzmeia Horn. 


New in DVD Reviews:
SONNY ROLLINS:
"SAXOPHONE COLOSSUS"

Most jazz documentaries spend the majority of their time dwelling on the past. However, Robert Mugge's 1986 film "Saxophone Colossus" caught Sonny Rollins in a particularly creative period. Mugge splits his film between an outdoor combo concert in upstate New York and the Tokyo premiere of Rollins' original concerto for saxophone and orchestra. Through it all, the saxophonist captivates with his boundless energy and creativity, Thomas Cunniffe reviews this new home video edition of the film, which features 4K remastering and Dolby sound. 

 
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