Retro Reviews

Sonny Rollins: “There Will Never Be Another You” (LP: Impulse 9349; CD: Impulse 5334723)

When Sonny Rollins signed with Impulse Records in 1965, his first recording project was a live outdoor concert at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. During the concert, Rollins wandered all around the performing space as he improvised, and the off-mike recording was shelved for 13 years, when it was issued as There Will Never Be Another You. While the album reflects an important milestone in Rollins’ live recordings, it is frequently misunderstood. Thomas Cunniffe examines the recording and the music in this Retro Review.

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Wes Montgomery: “In the Beginning” (Resonance 2014)

While Wes Montgomery was not well-known in the jazz world before 1960, he had been a semi-professional musician in his home town of Indianapolis since 1944. Following on their acclaimed album Echoes of Indiana Avenue, Resonance Records has issued a new collection called In the Beginning which traces Montgomery’s playing back to 1949. Thomas Cunniffe offers his thoughts on the set in this Retro Review.

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Re-Discovering Tubby Hayes

Tenor saxophonist Tubby Hayes has been nearly forgotten in the United States, but in the United Kingdom, he is revered as one of the greatest jazz musicians Britain ever produced. Hayes died over 40 years ago, but his legacy has been kept alive through an avalanche of live and unissued Hayes recordings issued in the past decade. In this expanded Retro Review. Thomas Cunniffe examines the wide-ranging music of this sometimes neglected giant.

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Wes Montgomery in Paris (Resonance 2032)

Resonance Records’ latest Wes Montgomery issue will not be new to seasoned fans. The guitarist’s 1965 Paris concert has been available as a bootleg for many years. However, Resonance’s edition offers the concert in its entirety, mastered from the original ORTF master tapes. It is also the first legitimate release of this material. Thomas Cunniffe reviews the recording, which also features Harold Mabern, Arthur Harper, Jimmy Lovelace and Johnny Griffin.

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Classic Brunswick & Columbia Teddy Wilson Sessions (Mosaic 265)

Teddy Wilson was one of the most prolific jazz musicians of the 1930s, recording with Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday, and many others. No single CD box set could ever cover all of Wilson’s recordings from this period, and Mosaic’s new collection contains some–but not all–of Wilson’s best sides as a leader, including all of his solo tracks, several combo sessions and all of his big band tracks. Thomas Cunniffe reviews the contents of the set in this month’s Retro Review.

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